Worship in Romans (17)

The Gospel of the Glory of God is always very near to mankind, and yet always very far from them: near, because the divine image is in mankind and the Gospel is the true meaning of man; far, because it is heard only by a faith and a repentance which overthrow all man’s glorying in himself and his works. [Romans 1:21]

—Arthur Michael Ramsey, The Glory of God and the Transfiguration of Christ, 100

The Perfect Worshiper (2)

In union with its heavenly Lord the Church on earth worships, looking back to what He did once on Calvary and looking up to what He now is with the Father. It is a worship in Christ and through Christ. If it be called a worship of sacrificial offering, it is so because it is through Christ who is high-priest: ‘through Him then let us offer up a sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of lips which make confession to His name’ (Heb. 13:15). If it be called a worship of glorifying, it is so because it is through Christ who glorifies the Father: ‘wherefore also through Him is the Amen, unto the glory of God through us’ (2 Cor. 1:20).

—Arthur Michael Ramsey, The Glory of God and the Transfiguration of Christ, 94-95

The Perfect Worshiper

The perfect act of worship is seen only in the Son of Man. By Him alone there is made the perfect acknowledgment upon earth of the glory of God and the perfect response to it. On the one hand the prophetic revelation of the glory of God is summed up in Him as He is Himself the glory of which the prophets, all unknowing, spake (cf. John xii, 41). On the other hand the ancient sacrifices are fulfilled in Him as He, priest and victim, makes the rational offering of His will in Gethsemane and on the Cross. In Christ the praise of God, the wonder before God, the thirst for God, the zeal for God’s righteousness, which fill the pages of the Psalter, find pure and flawless utterance. And in Him too man’s contrition for his own sin and the sin of the race finds its perfect expression; for the sinless Christ made before God that perfect acknowledgment of man’s sin which man cannot make for himself.

—Arthur Michael Ramsey, The Glory of God and the Transfiguration of Christ, 93