Praise and Adoration

Praise is a river glowing on joyously in its own channel, banked up on either side that it may run towards its one object, but adoration is the same river overflowing all banks, flooding the soul and covering the entire nature with its great waters; and these not so much moving and stirring as standing still in profound repose, mirroring the glory which shines down upon it; like a summer’s sun upon a sea of glass; not seeking the divine presence, but conscious of it to an unutterable degree, and therefore full of awe and peace, like the sea of Galilee when its waves felt the touch of the sacred feet.   Adoration is the fulness, the height and depth, the length and breadth of praise.

—C. H. Spurgeon

Obstacles to Adoration

C. S. Lewis identifies several things that keep us from adoration.

The first is inattention. How easy it is to be caught up into the whirl of life and miss the overtures of Divine Love.

A second obstacle is the wrong kind of attention. We see a sunset and are drawn into analysis rather than doxology.

A third obstacle to adoration is greed. Instead of simply enjoying pleasures, we demand more pleasures.

Lewis mentions one more obstruction: conceit. When conceit takes over, the focus is once again on how wonderful we are—which is why it so effectively severs the cords of adoration.

—Richard Foster, Prayer: Finding the Heart’s True Home, 85-87

How We Use the English Word “Worship”

We may distinguish three uses of the word “worship”; (i) to denote a particular element of what is generally referred to as worship, namely, adoration; (ii) to denote generally the public worship of the religious community gathered together and also the private religious exercises of the family and the individual; and (iii), in a still wider sense, to denote the whole life of the community or of the individual viewed as service of God.

—C.E.B. Cranfield, “Divine and Human Action: The Biblical Concept of Worship,” Interpretation 12:4 (October, 1958), 387

Defining Worship 35

We may distinguish three uses of the word “worship”: (i) to denote a particular element of what is generally referred to as worship, namely, adoration; (ii) to denote generally the public worship of the religious community gathered together and also the private religious exercises of the family and the individual; and (iii), in a still wider sense, to denote the whole life of the community or of the individual viewed as service of God.

—C.E.B. Cranfield, “Divine and Human Action: The Biblical Concept of Worship,” Interpretation 12:4 (October, 1958), 387