Mystery and Wonder

Here lies the mystery, the wonder, the glory of the Gospel, that He who is God, the Creator of all things, and worthy of the worship and praises of all creation, should become man and as a man worship God, and as a man lead us in our worship of God, that we might become the sons of God we are meant to be.

—James B. Torrance, “The Place of Jesus Christ in Worship,” in Theological Foundations for Ministry, 351

The Neglected Trinity (14)

In order to get a taste of the Trinitarian content of some contemporary worship songs, I’ve analyzed the lyrical content of many of the worship song albums that come out of the Vineyard movement over a period of 4 1/2 years. . . . I have looked through 28 worship albums produced by Vineyard Music between 1999 and 2004, containing 362 songs (though some songs appear more than once).

Three-person songs: 5 songs, 1.4%

Two-person songs: 32 songs, 8.8%

One-person songs (mostly about or to the Son): 140 songs, 38.7%

“You Lord” songs (“ambiguous songs that do not clarify exactly which person the song is about or being addressed to”): 185 songs, 51.1%

—Robin Parry, Worship Trinity, 140, 143

 

 

The Neglected Trinity (12)

The one scripturally authorized analogy of the Trinity . . . is the eschatological church (see John 17:22).

—John D. Witvliet, “What to Do with Our Renewed Trinitarian Enthusiasm: Forming Trinitarian Piety and Imagination through Worship and Catechesis,” in Trinitarian Theology for the Church: Scripture, Community, Worship, 250

The Neglected Trinity (8)

Trinitarian worship enacts, reflects and savors the relationality or communion that comprises both divine life and the Christian life. The doctrine of the Trinity offers a vision of each that is fundamentally relational and interpersonal. . . . Christian worship is not obeisance by which we appease a divine tyrant. We do not sing loud or pray hard in order to generate divine favor—the perfect theology of worship if we wanted to worship Baal. Worship, rather, is the joyful and solemn exchange of gifts.

—John D. Witvliet, “What to Do with Our Renewed Trinitarian Enthusiasm: Forming Trinitarian Piety and Imagination through Worship and Catechesis,” in Trinitarian Theology for the Church: Scripture, Community, Worship, 241-2

The Neglected Trinity (5)

The Trinity is not one doctrine among others, but gives distinctive shape to Christian faith and practice. . . . The Father, the Son, and the Spirit stride across the chapters of redemptive history toward the goal whose origin lies in an eternal pact between them. We worship, pray, confess, and sing our laments and praises to the Father, in the Son, by the Spirit. . . . We are adopted as children, not of a unipersonal God, but of the Father, as coheirs with His Son as mediator, united to the Son and His ecclesial body by the Spirit.

Michael Horton, Pilgrim Theology: Core Doctrines for Christian Disciples103

Attitude of Prayer

Almighty God, who hast promised to hear the petitions of those who ask in Thy Son’s Name: we beseech Thee mercifully to incline Thine ears to us who have now made our prayers and supplications unto Thee; and grant that those things which we have faithfully asked according to Thy will, may effectually be obtained, to the relief of our necessity, and to the setting forth of Thy glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

—Book of Common Prayer (1928)