Theology and Doxology

The purpose of the theologian is to serve the church so that the people of God worship Him more faithfully.

Theology is by definition not an ivory tower discipline. It is not merely a form of academic discourse. When rightly conducted, theology is the conversation of the people of God seeking to understand the Lord whom we worship and how He wills to be worshiped.

—Albert Mohler, “The Whole Earth Is Full of his Glory: The Recovery of Authentic Worship, Part One” http://www.almohler.com/commentary_read.php?cdate=2006-02-06

Right Worship

God is jealous for His own honor and He rightly seeks His own honor. He says, “I the Lord your God am a jealous God” (Ex. 20:5) and “My glory I will not give to another”  (Is. 48:11).  Something within us should tremble and rejoice at this fact. We should tremble with fear lest we rob God’s glory from Him. And we should rejoice that it is right that God seek His own honor and be jealous for His own honor, for He, infinitely more than anything He has made, is worthy of honor. The twenty-four elders in heaven feel this reverence and joy, for they fall down before God’s throne and cast their crowns before him singing, “You are worthy, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for You created all things, and by Your will they existed and were created”  (Rev. 4:11). When we feel the absolute rightness of this deep within ourselves we then have the appropriate heart attitude for genuine worship.

—Wayne Grudem, Systematic Theology, 1005

Come to the Table 13

SEVEN ASPECTS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER

1. Remembrance: The Lord’s Supper as a Memorial  (1 Corinthians 11:24-26)

2. Communion: The Lord’s Supper as Fellowship with Christ and with One Another  (1 Corinthians 10:14-17; 11:27-34)

3. Forgiveness: The Lord’s Supper as a Table of Mercy  (Matthew 26:26-28)

4. Covenant: The Lord’s Supper as a Renewal of Baptismal Vows  (Mark 14:22-25)

5. Nourishment: The Lord’s Supper as Bread from Heaven  (John 6:35-58)

6. Anticipation: The Lord’s Supper as a Declaration of Hope  (Luke 22:14-27)

7. Eucharist: The Lord’s Supper as a Joyous Thanksgiving Celebration  (Acts 2:46-47)


—Gordon T. Smith, A Holy Meal: The Lord’s Supper in the Life of the Church

Come to the Table 9

With the current situation of the American church in mind, we can say the following: frequent eating and drinking at the Lord’s table will inoculate the church against the Gnosticism of modern Christianity (not to mention trendy spiritualisms) that would reduce religion to a private, inner, purely “spiritual” experience; a church whose central religious rite includes baked goods is being trained in proper dominion over creation and will refuse resurgent nature worship in both its religious and political guises; a church that celebrates a feast of wine is being formed into a joyful community that contests the equation of Christian seriousness with prudishness; a church that celebrates the communal meal is bound into one body and will resist the corrosive individualism of modern culture that has too often invaded the church; a church that shares bread at the Lord’s table is learning the virtues of generosity and humility; a church that proclaims the Lord’s sacrificial death in the Supper is exercising itself in self-sacrifice and becoming immune to the lure of self-fulfillment. Not automatically, but in the context of biblical teaching and a robust community life, the skills and virtues practiced at the Lord’s table will spill over to fill the whole church with a eucharistic ethos. In short, the Supper exercises the church in the protocols of life in the presence of God.

—Peter J. Leithart, “The Way Things Really Ought to Be: Eucharist, Eschatology and Culture” Westminster Theological Journal 59 (1997):176

Come to the Table 7

The Lord’s Supper is first and foremost an encounter with God’s love. As St. Francis de Sales counseled, “Your great intention in receiving Communion should be to advance, strengthen, and comfort yourself in the love of God.”

—Gordon T. Smith, A Holy Meal: The Lord’s Supper in the Life of the Church, 66